Friendship Album, 1933: Episode 21

This week we’re spending time with Bess. Now, one of the things that interests me about Bess is that she’s a PK–a preacher’s kid–or to put it more delicately, the daughter of an Episcopal priest. I don’t know about you, but some of the wildest kids I knew growing up were PKs. They seemed intent on proving that just because their fathers were pastors, it didn’t mean they weren’t wild and crazy guys.

How I imagine a young Bess …

It’s hard to imagine that Bess going wild as a teenager, isn’t it? It doesn’t seem to be part of her temperament to act out. But I could see her being a bit of a prankster, and if she drank a glass of champagne at a high school graduation party, well, that wouldn’t surprise me either. Of course, she graduated high school around 1913–do you think they had champagne at high school parties back then?

Cary Grant and Irene Dunn in “The Awful Truth” (1937)

One of the subjects that gets discussed in this week’s episode is the difficulties of parenting older children. I definitely feel for Bess, who has to be both father and mother to her daughters. I have a son in college and another in high school, so I’ve reached that stage of parenthood where mostly you just make yourself available as needed, especially with the ones who are hardly home any more. Still, there times I’d like to be able to bend my children to my will, especially when I see them making the same mistakes I did at their age.

The question we’re left with at the end of this episode is what will happen with Bess and Joe Mayfield? In all honesty, I don’t know! I think the attraction between the two of them is clear, but is romance a possibility? Is Bess ready for that? I’m not sure that she is, but people can surprise you, even the ones you’ve made up!

If you’re enjoying Friendship Album, 1933, I hope you’ll review it on iTunes (you can search for the Quiltfiction Podcast, or use this handy link: QuiltFiction Podcast). It’s a great way to let other people know about the story.

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Comments

  1. My Great-Grandma Bessie was born in 1908. As kids we were always shocked to hear about our well mannered Grandma Bessie rebelling in high school and wearing pants to school. 🙂

    1. Author

      Love this! I think Bess could have definitely gotten involved in some escapades, just like your great-grandma Bessie (Bess? Bessie? Oooh, I see a connection here …).

  2. Loving the idea of Bess being rambunctious as a kid…. Weren’t we all … I think the more we got clamped down on the more we tried to break free.

    As for Bess … I think it is a little soon for a serious romance but a slowly developing friendship into love over a year or two would be good. I do not see her daughters accepting Joe as a step father at this point in their lives…. Maybe in a year or two when they are off to college and expanding their own lives they would be more accepting … but teenagers seem to be think widowed parents do not have the need for love….. Just my opinion

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